USS Galveston C-17 - History

USS Galveston C-17 - History

USS Galveston C-17

Galveston

A coastal city in southeastern Texas located on Galveston Island.

I

(Cruiser No. 17: dp. 3,200; 1. 308'10"; b. 44'; dr. 15'9"; s.
16 k.; cpl. 339; a. 10 5", 8 6-pdrs., 2 1-pdrs., 4.30 cal. ma. )

The first Galveston was laid down 19 January 1901 by William R. Trigg Co., Richmond, VA.; launched 23 July 1903, sponsored by Miss Ella Sealey, and commissioned at Norfolk, VA., 15 February 1905, Comdr. W. G. Cutler in command.

Galveston departed Norfolk on 10 April 1905 for Galveston, Tex., where on 19 April she was presented a silver service by citizens of her namesake city. Returning to the East Coast 3 May, she departed New York 18 June for Cherbourg, France, where she arrived 30 June and took part in the ceremonies commemorating the return of the remains of John Paul Jones to the U.S. Naval Academy, reaching Annapolis on 22 July. She next joined Dolphin and Mayfower as one of the host ships for the Russo-Japanese Peace Conference (4 8 August) serving at Oyster Bay, N.Y., Newport, R.I., and Portsmouth, N.H. During 13 August to 11 September 1905 the cruiser had special duty with Minister Plenipotentiary HoHander's State Department cruise from Norfolk to the West Indies ports of Santo Domingo and Portau-Prince, followed by preparations for foreign service at Norfolk and New York

Galveston departed Tompkinsville, N.Y., on 28 December 1905 for service in the Mediterranean with the European Squadron until 28 March 1906 when she set course from Port Said to join the fleet at Cavite, P.I., for service on the Asiatic Station She was n part of the meet reception for Secretary of Navy William H. Taft at Manila on 13 October 1906, served in his honor escort to Vladivostock, Siberia, the next month; and spent the following years in cruises among ports of the Philippines, China and Japan. She arrived in San Francisco, Calif., from the Philippines on 17 February 1910, was decommissioned in the Puget Sound Navy Yard on the 21st, and recommissioned there on 29 June 1912 for service that included a training cruise to Alaska. She departed the Puget Sound Navy Yard on 19 September 1913, touching San Francisco, Hawaii and Guam on her way to Cavite P.I., where she joined the Asiatic Fleet on 2 November.

Galveston's tour on the Asiatic Station was largely taken up with convoy service for supply ships and troop transports shuttling Marines and other garrison forces and stores between the Philippines and ports of Japan and China for the protection of American lives, property, and interests with brief intervals of Yangtze River Patrol for the same purpose. She also made one convoy trip from the Philippines to British North Borneo and two trips to Guam in the Marianas She arrived in San Diego from the Asiatic Station on 10 January 1918 and transited the Panama Canal on the 23rd, convoping British troopship Athenic from Cristobal, C.Z., to Norfolk, thence to New York, arriving on 11 February 1918.

Galveston was assigned to Squadron 2 of the Atlantic Fleet Cruiser Force for convoy escort duties concurrent with the training of Armed Guard crews. After one convoy run through heavy weather from Tompkinsville to Halifax, Nova Scotia, she was largely employed in repeated convoy escort voyages between New York and Norfolk until 22 September 1918 when she departed Tompkinsville with a 19-ship convoy bound for Ponta Delgada, Azores. On the morning of 30 September the convoy was attacked by German submarine U-152. Alerted by the 'dashing explosion to starboard, Galveston headed for the scene of attack and opened fire on the U-boat. Cargo ship Ticonderoga was shelled and sunk in the 2 hour battle with a loss of 213 lives but the remaining ships of the convoy were brought safely into Bonta Delgada 4 October 1918.

Galveston returned to Norfolk on 20 October 1918 to resume her coastal convoy escort work until the Armistice. She arrived in Plymouth, England, 26 March 1919; transported a contingent of British-American troops from Harwich to Murmansk, U,S.S,R., then served as flagship of Squadron 3, Patrol Force, in Western European waters. She was largely concerned with the movement of prize crews and repatriation of crews of German ships until 22 June 1919 when she got underway to serve as station and flagship at Constantinople, Turkey. She arrived on station 14 July 1919 and broke the nag of Rear Admiral Mark L. Bristol; transported refugees and American Red Cross officials to Constantinople from the Russian ports of Novorossisk and Theodosia; and carried Rear Admiral N. ~, McCully from Theodosia to Yalta. She was relieved as station ship at Constantinople on 15 July 1920 by cruiser Chattanooga.

With the initial assignment of hull classification symbols and numbers to U.S. Navy ships in 1920, Oalve~ton was classified as PG-31. She then returned home by way of Suez Canal and Mediterranean port reached Boston 17 September 1920, and became a unit of the Special Service Squadron watching over American interests in waters ranging to the Panama Canal and down the West Coast of the Central American States to Corinto, Nicaragua. On 8 August 1921 she was reclassified CL-19. She also intermittently patrolled in the Gulf of Mexico with periodic calls at ports of Florida, Texas Alabama, and Louisiana. The end of this service was climaxed by a visit to her namesake city in Texas, where she arrived from Panama 26 August 1923 to represent the Navy at the American Legion convention. She then steamed to the Charleston Navy Yard and decommissioned 30 November 1923.

Galveston was recommissioned 5 February 1924 for duty with the Special Service Squadron. She based most of her operations out of Christobal and Balboa Panama, in a series of patrols that took her off the coast of Honduras, Cuba, and Nicaragua. On 27 August 1926 she arrived at Bluefields, Nicaragua, landing a force of 195 men at the request of the American Consul to protect American interests during a revolutionary uprising. Thereafter much of her time was spent cruising between that port and Balboa to cooperate with the State Department in the restoration and preservation of order, and to insure the protection of American lives and property in Central America.

After a voyage north in the fall of 1929 for overhaul in the Boston Navy Yard, Galveston revisited her namesake 26 to 29 October for the Navy Day celebrations, then touched Cuba on her way to Haiti, where she embarked Marines for transport to the Panama Canal. She resumed her watchful cruises between Balboa and Corinto until 19 May 1930 when she transited the Panama Canal for a last courtesy visit to Galveston (24 31 May) before inactivation overhaul in the Philadelphia Navy Yard. She was decommissioned at Philadelphia on 2 September 1930; struck from the Navy List 1 November 1930, and sold for scrapping 13 September 1933 to the Northern Metal Co. of Philadelphia Pa.


Unit History: USS Galveston

USS Galveston (PG-31/CL-19/C-17) was a Denver-class protected cruiser in the United States Navy during World War I. She was the first Navy ship named for the city of Galveston, Texas.

Galveston was laid down 19 January 1901 by William R. Trigg Company, Richmond, Virginia launched 23 July 1903 sponsored by Miss Ella Sealey and commissioned at Norfolk, Virginia, 15 February 1905, Commander W. G. Cutler in command.

Galveston departed Norfolk on 10 April 1905 for Galveston, Tex., where on 19 April she was presented a silver service by citizens of her namesake city. Returning to the East Coast 3 May, she departed New York 18 June for Cherbourg, France, where she arrived 30 June and took part in the ceremonies commemorating the return of the remains of John Paul Jones to the U.S. Naval Academy, reaching Annapolis on 22 July. She next joined Dolphin and Mayflower as one of the host ships for the Russo-Japanese Peace Conference (4 August–8 August) serving at Oyster Bay, N.Y. Newport, R.I., and Portsmouth, N.H. During 13 August to 11 September 1905 the cruiser had special duty with Minister Plenipotentiary Hollander’s State Department cruise from Norfolk to the West Indies ports of Santo Domingo and Port-au-Prince, followed by preparations for foreign service at Norfolk and New York.

Galveston departed Tompkinsville, N.Y., on 28 December 1905 for service in the Mediterranean with the European Squadron until 28 March 1906 when she set course from Port Said to join the fleet at Cavite, P.I., for service on the Asiatic Station. She was a part of the fleet reception for Secretary of War William H. Taft at Manila on 13 October 1906 served in his honor escort to Vladivostok, Siberia, the next month and spent the following years in cruises among ports of the Philippines, China and Japan. She arrived in San Francisco, Calif., from the Philippines on 17 February 1910 was decommissioned in the Puget Sound Navy Yard on the 21st and recommissioned there on 29 June 1912 for service that included a training cruise to Alaska. She departed the Puget Sound Navy Yard on 19 September 1913, touching San Francisco, Hawaii and Guam on her way to Cavite, P.I., where she joined the Asiatic Fleet on 2 November.

Galveston’s tour on the Asiatic Station was largely taken up with convoy service for supply ships and troop transports shuttling Marines and other garrison forces and stores between the Philippines and ports of Japan and China for the protection of American lives, property, and interests with brief intervals of Yangtze River Patrol for the same purpose. She also made one convoy trip from the Philippines to British North Borneo and two trips to Guam in the Marianas. She arrived in San Diego from the Asiatic Station on 10 January 1918 and transited the Panama Canal on the 23rd, convoying British troopship Athenic from Cristobal, C.Z., to Norfolk, thence to New York, arriving on 11 February 1918.

Galveston was assigned to Squadron 2 of the Atlantic Fleet Cruiser Force for convoy escort duties concurrent with the training of Armed Guard crews. After one convoy run through heavy weather from Tompkinsville to Halifax (former city), Nova Scotia, she was largely employed in repeated convoy escort voyages between New York and Norfolk until 22 September 1918 when she departed Tompkinsville with a 19-ship convoy bound for Ponta Delgada, Azores. On the morning of 30 September the convoy was attacked by German submarine U-152. Alerted by the flashing explosion to starboard, Galveston headed for the scene of attack and opened fire on the U-boat. Cargo ship Ticonderoga was shelled and sunk in the 2-hour battle with a loss of 213 lives but the remaining ships of the convoy were brought safely into Ponta Delgada 4 October 1918.

Galveston returned to Norfolk on 20 October 1918 to resume her coastal convoy escort work until the Armistice. She arrived in Plymouth, England, 26 March 1919 transported a contingent of British-American troops from Harwich to Murmansk, U.S.S.R. then served as flagship of Squadron 3, Patrol Force, in Western European waters. She was largely concerned with the movement of prize crews and repatriation of crews of German ships until 22 June 1919 when she got underway to serve as station and flagship at Constantinople, Turkey. She arrived on station 14 July 1919 and broke the flag of Rear Admiral Mark L. Bristol transported refugees and American Red Cross officials to Constantinople from the Russian ports of Novorossiysk and Theodosia and carried Rear Admiral Newton A. McCully from Theodosia to Yalta. She was relieved as station ship at Constantinople on 15 July 1920 by cruiser Chattanooga.

With the initial assignment of hull classification symbols and numbers to U.S. Navy ships in 1920, Galveston was classified as PG-31. She then returned home by way of Suez Canal and Mediterranean ports reached Boston 17 September 1920, and became a unit of the Special Service Squadron watching over American interests in waters ranging to the Panama Canal and down the West Coast of the Central American States to Corinto, Nicaragua. On 8 August 1921 she was reclassified CL-19. She also intermittently patrolled in the Gulf of Mexico with periodic calls at ports of Florida, Texas, Alabama, and Louisiana. The end of this service was climaxed by a visit to her namesake city in Texas, where she arrived from Panama 26 August 1923 to represent the Navy at the American Legion convention. She then steamed to the Charleston Navy Yard and decommissioned 30 November 1923.

Galveston was recommissioned 5 February 1924 for duty with the Special Service Squadron. She based most of her operations out of Christobal and Balboa, Panama, in a series of patrols that took her off the coast of Honduras, Cuba, and Nicaragua. On 27 August 1926 she arrived at Bluefields, Nicaragua, landing a force of 195 men at the request of the American Consul to protect American interests during a revolutionary uprising. Thereafter much of her time was spent cruising between that-port and Balboa to cooperate with the State Department in the restoration and preservation of order, and to insure the protection of American lives and property in Central America.

After a voyage north in the fall of 1929 for overhaul in the Boston Navy Yard, Galveston revisited her namesake 26 October to 29 October for the Navy Day celebrations, then touched Cuba on her way to Haiti, where she embarked Marines for transport to the Panama Canal. She resumed her watchful cruises between Balboa and Corinto until 19 May 1930 when she transited the Panama Canal for a last courtesy visit to Galveston (24 May–31 May) before inactivation overhaul in the Philadelphia Navy Yard.

She was decommissioned at Philadelphia on 2 September 1930 struck from the Navy List 1 November 1930, and sold for scrapping 13 September 1933 to the Northern Metal Company of Philadelphia Pa.


Galveston Historic Seaport – Home of the 1877 Tall Ship ELISSA

2200 Harborside | 409-763-1877
Open Daily from 10 a.m. – 5 p.m. (last ticket sold at 4:30 p.m.)
Admission: Admission: Adult – $10 | Youth (6-18) – $7.00 | Children (5 & Under) – Free Admission

PARDON OUR MESS!

The Texas Seaport Museum is currently undergoing renovation for a summer launch of a new interactive experience. Ship to Shore will debut in 2021 and tell Galveston’s rich immigration history through a new, state-of-the-art, experience. During construction, the museum will be closed, however, tours of the 1877 Tall Ship ELISSA and our Harbor Tours are available daily.

Galveston Historical Foundation brought ELISSA, an 1877 square-rigged iron barque, from a scrapyard in Piraeus Harbor, Greece to Galveston to begin restoration work in 1978. By 1982, GHF staff and volunteers completed restoration and transformed this rare, historic vessel into a floating museum that would actively sail. Today, the 1877 Tall Ship ELISSA is one of only three ships of her kind in the world to still actively sail and welcomes over 40,000 visitors annually. She also serves as the Official Tall Ship of Texas, a National Historic Landmark, and a symbol of the Gulf Coast’s historic beginnings as a seaport and active waterfront. The 1877 ELISSA welcomes visitors at the Galveston Historic Seaport. Experience Galveston’s maritime history daily.

PLEASE NOTE | The Galveston Historic Seaport will be closed November 7-12, Thanksgiving Day, Christmas Eve, Christmas Day and New Year’s Day. We will be open Saturday, November 2 from 10 am – 4 pm, and Sunday, November 3 from 10 am – 2 pm.

PRIVATE TOURS | Discounts are available for advance group tours. Call 409-765-3432 for prices and schedules.

Our Galveston Immigration Database, located inside the Galveston Historic Seaport, allows visitors to search for information taken from ships’ passenger manifests pertaining to their ancestors’ arrival in Texas. For your convenience, the database is also available online. Click here to learn more and access it online.

The Galveston Historic Seaport and Galveston Historical Foundation offer teachers and students a large variety of TEKS aligned field trips focusing on history, math, and science. For more information, download the PDF below, contact us at 409-763-1877.

500 on Elissa and museum site
300 for seated dinner on the pier

Fee includes access to the 1877 Tall Ship Elissa’s decks, galleries, officers’ quarters, and galley for use as a serving area or bar, as well as the museum’s pier, galleries, and restrooms. All functions must be catered no kitchen facilities are available. Wheelchair accessible, except Elissa. For more information or reservations:

Lauraleigh Gourley, Rentals Manager of Historic Properties
Galveston Historical Foundation
2002 Strand, Galveston, Tx. 77550
(409) 765-3402

ACCESSIBILITY TO THE GALVESTON HISTORIC SEAPORT

The museum galleries and restrooms are completely accessible by wheelchair. There are about 8 steps and a ramp to go aboard Elissa’s main deck, and a couple of steps (depending on the tide) to board Seagull II. Please call 409-763-1877 in advance so that we can try to accommodate any special needs.


USS Galveston C-17 - History

This page features all the views we have of USS Galveston 's actions and activities.

If you want higher resolution reproductions than the digital images presented here, see: "How to Obtain Photographic Reproductions."

Click on the small photograph to prompt a larger view of the same image.

Launches a "Talos" guided missile on 24 February 1959, the first time the "Talos" was fired at sea.
This photograph was released by the Department of Defense on 12 March 1959.

Official U.S. Navy Photograph, from the collections of the Naval Historical Center.

Online Image: 83KB 740 x 610 pixels

"A 'Talos' missile roars off the fantail of the Guided Missile Cruiser USS Galveston (CLG-3) in the Caribbean Sea. The deadly 'Talos', which has been in the testing stages for the past three years, was again proven operational last month when the Galveston , the ship that first fired the missile in 1958, made history again by completing the longest range 'Talos' firing at sea." (Quoted from the original photo caption, released by the ship's Public Information Office on 17 March 1961.)


USS Galveston C-17 - History

USS Galveston , a 3200-ton Denver class protected cruiser built at Richmond, Virginia, was commissioned in February 1905. During the next eight months she visited Galveston, Texas, crossed the Atlantic to France to participate in the return of the remains of John Paul Jones to the United States, helped host the Russo-Japanese peace conference, and carried State Department representatives to the Dominican Republic and Haiti. In late December 1905 the cruiser left the U.S. for service in the Mediterranean and the Far East, where she remained until February 1910. After operating off the U.S. West Coast and in Alaskan waters during 1912-1913, Galveston was back on the Asiatic Station from November 1913 to late 1917.

Galveston next performed World War I convoy escort and training duties in the Atlantic, taking part in an engagement with the German Submarine U-152 while en route to the Azores on 30 September 1918. In March 1919 she began service in European waters, initially carrying troops to northern Russia. From July 1919 until July 1920 she was station ship at Constantinople. Among her functions there was the transportation of refugees, Red Cross officials and senior officers in the troubled Black Sea region.

Reclassified as a gunboat in July 1920, with the hull number PG-31, Galveston became a light cruiser (CL-19) in August 1921. She operated with the Special Service Squadron in the Caribbean and off Central America for nearly all of the 1920s, landing forces in Nicaragua during that Nation's revolution in 1926. USS Galveston concluded her two and a half decades of service in early September 1930, when she was decommissioned at the Philadelphia Navy Yard. Stricken from the Navy list a few months later, she was sold for scrapping in September 1933.

This page features, and provides links to, all the views we have related to USS Galveston (Cruiser # 17, later PG-31 and CL-19).

If you want higher resolution reproductions than the digital images presented here, see: "How to Obtain Photographic Reproductions."

Click on the small photograph to prompt a larger view of the same image.

USS Galveston (Cruiser # 17)

Underway soon after completion, circa 1905.
Note that her topmasts are partially lowered.

Courtesy of Donald M. McPherson, 1969.

U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.

Online Image: 72KB 740 x 445 pixels

USS Galveston (Cruiser # 17)

In Manila Bay, Philippine Islands, 12 July 1908.

Courtesy of Donald M. McPherson, 1975.

U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.

Online Image: 94KB 740 x 560 pixels

USS Galveston (Cruiser # 17)

On the target range in Manila Bay, Philippines, in May 1916.

Courtesy of the Naval Historical Foundation. Collection of Fred Iverson, 1959.

U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.

Online Image: 127KB 740 x 555 pixels

USS Galveston (Cruiser # 17)

In the Dewey Drydock, Olongapo Naval Station, Philippines, circa 1916.

Courtesy of Arthur B. Furnas, 1969.

U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.

Online Image: 63KB 740 x 445 pixels

Asiatic Fleet warships off Chefoo, China , circa 1914-1916

Ships present are (from left to right):
USS Galveston (Cruiser # 17)
USS Bainbridge (Destroyer # 1) and
USS Saratoga (Armored Cruiser # 2).

Collection of C.A. Shively, 1978.

U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.

Online Image: 117KB 740 x 560 pixels

USS Galveston (Cruiser # 17)

Moored in an Italian port, circa 1919-1920.
This photograph was mounted in a Christmas calendar for the year 1922, given by Arthur A. Wright to his mother in December 1921. See Photo # NH 86264-A for a view of this calendar.

Collection of Arthur A. Wright, 1978.

U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.

Online Image: 54KB 740 x 400 pixels

U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.

Online Image: 66KB 740 x 515 pixels

In Central American waters, circa 1924-1927.

Collection of John Spector, donated by Mrs. Minnie Spector, 1986.

U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.

Online Image: 43KB 740 x 490 pixels

USS Galveston (CL-19) (center)
with
USS Quail (AM-15) (at left)

Probably at Corinto, Nicaragua, in December 1926 -- February 1927, during the Nicaraguan revolution.

Collection of John Spector, donated by Mrs. Minnie Spector, 1986.

U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.

Online Image: 44KB 740 x 460 pixels

USS Galveston (CL-19) is seen in the background of the following photograph of her sister, USS Cleveland (CL-21):

USS Cleveland (CL-21), closest to camera,
and
USS Galveston (CL-19)

Seen from USS Hannibal (AG-1), circa 1923, probably in Cuban waters.

Courtesy of the Naval Historical Foundation. Collection of LeRoy R. Horstman.


GALVESTON CL 19

This section lists the names and designations that the ship had during its lifetime. The list is in chronological order.


    Denver Class Cruiser
    Keel Laid January 19 1901 - Launched January 23 1903

Naval Covers

This section lists active links to the pages displaying covers associated with the ship. There should be a separate set of pages for each incarnation of the ship (ie, for each entry in the "Ship Name and Designation History" section). Covers should be presented in chronological order (or as best as can be determined).

Since a ship may have many covers, they may be split among many pages so it doesn't take forever for the pages to load. Each page link should be accompanied by a date range for covers on that page.

Postmarks

This section lists examples of the postmarks used by the ship. There should be a separate set of postmarks for each incarnation of the ship (ie, for each entry in the "Ship Name and Designation History" section). Within each set, the postmarks should be listed in order of their classification type. If more than one postmark has the same classification, then they should be further sorted by date of earliest known usage.

A postmark should not be included unless accompanied by a close-up image and/or an image of a cover showing that postmark. Date ranges MUST be based ONLY ON COVERS IN THE MUSEUM and are expected to change as more covers are added.
 
>>> If you have a better example for any of the postmarks, please feel free to replace the existing example.


Galveston Naval Museum

V isit the Galveston Naval Museum and immerse yourself in its National Heritage. Take your time exploring these historic WWII vessels on a self-guided tour or with one of the museum’s tour guides. Capture the experience as a predator patrolling underwater in the Pacific or as the protector of Allied forces in the North Atlantic. Gain a unique memory of being on the USS Cavalla, a World War II submarine that sank a Japanese aircraft carrier involved in the Pearl Harbor attacks, or the USS Stewart, the only Edsall-class destroyer escort preserved in the United States.

You can experience the history, mystery, and sacrifices of the crews standing watch on these WWII fighting vessels.

Hours

  • Monday: 9:00 AM – 5:00 PM
  • Tuesday: 9:00 AM – 5:00 PM
  • Wednesday: 9:00 AM – 5:00 PM
  • Thursday: 9:00 AM – 5:00 PM
  • Friday: 9:00 AM – 5:00 PM
  • Saturday: 9:00 AM – 5:00 PM
  • Sunday: 9:00 AM – 5:00 PM

Admission

  • Adult: $13
  • Senior 65+: $10
  • Veteran (with valid ID): $7
  • Active Military (with valid ID): Free
  • Child (5-11): $8
  • Groups (15 or more with advanced reservation): $6

Parking

  • $6 per car. Seawolf Park staff can provide rates for other vehicle types. Free parking for Veterans with disabilities and City of Galveston Residents.

General

  • Group Sleepover Visits
  • Spring and Summer Camps
  • Birthday Parties / Day Camps
  • Military & Special Ceremonies

Latest Tweets

On this day, we honor those men and women who died defending this country.

Everyone have a great #MemorialDay.

History

In 1971, USS Cavalla (SS-244) was transferred from the US Navy to the US Submarine Veterans of World War II, Texas (SubVets) and towed to its current berth at Seawolf Park. Seawolf Park was named for the submarine and crew of the USS Seawolf (SS-197) which was lost at sea during WWII. Three years later, the USS Stewart (DE-238) joined USS Cavalla to create a unique pair of warfighting vessels – Predator and Protector. Since 1998, the Cavalla Historical Foundation assumed oversight of the Galveston Naval Museum, formerly the American Undersea Warfare Center and its mission to restore, maintain and operate USS Cavalla, USS Stewart, the sail of the USS Tautog (SSN-639) and the conning tower of the USS Carp (SS-338). The American Undersea Warfare Center became known as the Galveston Naval Museum in 2018.

The USS Cavalla is best know as the “Avenger of Pearl Harbor” sinking the Japanese Aircraft Carrier, Shokaku, a veteran of the Pearl Harbor attack. This action earned the Cavalla the prestigious Presidential Unit Citation.

The Cavalla has been in Galveston for almost 50 years, serving as a museum ship on Seawolf Park since 1971. Long after her military service to her country, she continues to serve as an educational site for the young and young at heart to remember and learn about WWII and American Naval History.

The USS Stewart began her service operating out of Miami as a “school ship” training student officers.

She escorted President Roosevelt in the presidential yacht down the Potomac River to rendezvous with USS Iowa in the Chesapeake Bay for his mission to Casablanca and Tehran. In 1944, she commenced North Atlantic convoy operations.


USS Galveston (CL-93)

USS Galveston (CL-93/ CLG-3) was laid down as a Cleveland class light cruiser but was eventually completed as a guided missile cruiser and served throughout the 1960s, fighting in Vietnam.

The Galveston was laid down on 20 February 1944 and was launched on 22 April 1945. Work continued even after the end of the Second World War and she was almost complete when construction was suspended on 24 June 1946. The partially completed cruiser was allocated to the Atlantic Reserve Fleet, where she remained for the next decade.

In the mid 1950s it was decided to convert a number of Cleveland class cruisers into guided missile cruisers, and the Galveston was one of the ships that were chosen. She was reclassified as CLG-93 on 4 February 1956, retaining her original 'cruiser' number, but was reclassified as CLG-3 on 23 May 1957 when the guided missile cruisers were given their own numerical sequence. She was finally commissioned on 28 May 1958 and began a prolonged period of tests and trials of her new Talos missile system.

Builder's trials occupied the second half of 1958. The Navy then tested out the missile in the West Indies early in 1959, achieving the first Talos missile launch at sea on 24 February 1959. The rest of the year was covered by a shakedown cruise, acceptance trials and radar tests. She spent most of 1960 in the Philadelphia Naval Yard, and the Talos missile underwent more trials in 1961. As a result of all of these tests the fire control system was modified during an overhaul that lasted from August 1961 until July 1962.

On 24 August 1962 the Galveston finally joined the active fleet when she became part of Cruiser-Destroyer Flotilla 9, US Pacific Fleet. She operated off the US west coast until October 1963, then sailed to the Western Pacific to join the 8th Fleet.

On 4 June 1965 the Galveston left San Diego and sailed to South Vietnam for her first combat tour. She carried out a mix of duties that would have been familiar to her Second World War sisters, protecting the fleet carriers and providing fire support for American and South Vietnamese troops operating near the coast. She also provided search and rescue facilities.

This combat tour ended in November-December 1965 and by 18 December the Galveston was back at San Diego. She operated between the US west coast and Hawaii between January and 31 July 1966. In 1967 she was transferred to the East Coast and the Atlantic Fleet.

In October 1968 the Galveston left the US for Vietnam and her final combat tour. She served in two areas - Yankee Station in the north of the war zone and the Da Nang area further south. Once again she provided fire support for the ground troops, firing 3,500 rounds of 5in and 6in shells from her remaining guns in one nine day period.

She returned to the US on 2 February 1969. She had one final spell with the Atlantic fleet before being decommissioned on 25 May 1970 and struck from the Navy List on 21 December 1973.


Tuesday, December 22, 2015

Rest in Peace, Soupy

It is with great sadness that I announce that Soupy is gone.

He passed away a little after 4 am (12 -22) and we got the call from Cindy this morning around 4:45.

Yesterday he had a turn for the worse. He was carrying a 103 degree fever, he doctors said that his heart was only working at 10% capacity. They reviewed his living will and in that he had stated that he did not want to be kept alive by artificial means. They removed that vent that was helping him breath and though he could not breath without it for more than 3 hours before, He lasted through the night. I will put out word of the funeral arrangements as soon as they are finalized.

All of us in the USS Galveston CLG-3 Shipmates Association owe him a debt of gratitude because without him this organization would not be what it is. Yes, he dealt us a great blow with his indiscretion near the end, but what great man hasn't had an indiscretion in his life, and he paid for it with his life as I suspected it would.

I have labeled the photo above"Soupy at the helm", he is at his desk in his glory, where he did all of those things for us (his labor of love). This picture was taken just after Joanies memorial.


Stan Shock
December 22, 2015


Tall Ships® Galveston

The 2018 Tall Ships® Galveston festival hosted tours of the participating ships, numerous special events, sail away excursions, music, food and fun in a family-friendly format. Galveston Island served as the first port in the TALL SHIPS CHALLENGE® Gulf Coast 2018 Series, which saw participating ships travel across the Gulf of Mexico as they visit other participating cities throughout the month of April.

ABOUT THE TALL SHIPS CHALLENGE®

The Tall Ships Challenge® is a series of annual events organized by Tall Ships America. These events draw hundreds of thousands of people to witness beautiful tall ships from the age of sail and provides a unique opportunity for the participants to interact with the crews of different vessels in friendly rivalry as they race from port to port.

The series began in 2001 on the Great Lakes and saw vessels from six countries and visited seven US and Canadian ports. Since its launch, the Tall Ships Challenge® series has visited dozens of North American cities, bringing millions of spectators down to the waterfront to experience the tall ships and creating a cumulative economic impact of hundreds of millions of dollars for host communities. It has continued to grow every year and is an eagerly anticipated event in the seaside communities that host the vessels and beyond.

ABOUT GALVESTON HISTORICAL FOUNDATION

Galveston Historical Foundation (GHF) was formed as the Galveston Historical Society in 1871 and merged with a new organization formed in 1954 as a non-profit entity devoted to historic preservation and history in Galveston County. Over the last sixty years, GHF has expanded its mission to encompass community redevelopment, historic preservation advocacy, maritime preservation, coastal resiliency and stewardship of historic properties. GHF embraces a broader vision of history and architecture that encompasses advancements in environmental and natural sciences and their intersection with historic buildings and coastal life and conceives of history as an engaging story of individual lives and experiences on Galveston Island from the 19th century to the present day.


Watch the video: Special Operations Boat Airdrop From C-17: Low Velocity Airdrop Delivery System LVADS