Advertising codes for alcohol and tobacco in the 1930s

Advertising codes for alcohol and tobacco in the 1930s

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  • St-Raphaël Quinquina.

    SOLON Albert (1897 - 1973)

  • Weekend cigarettes with an English taste.

    SEPO Severo Pozzati, known as (1895 - 1983)

To close

Title: St-Raphaël Quinquina.

Author : SOLON Albert (1897 - 1973)

Creation date : 1936

Date shown:

Dimensions: Height 160 - Width 235.5

Technique and other indications: Color lithograph on paper

Storage location: Website advertising museum

Contact copyright: © Les Arts décoratifs - Musée de la Publicité, Paris - Photo Laurent Sully Jaulmes - All rights reserved

Picture reference: inv. 14180

© Les Arts décoratifs - Musée de la Publicité, Paris - Photo Laurent Sully Jaulmes - All rights reserved

To close

Title: Weekend cigarettes with an English taste.

Author : SEPO Severo Pozzati, known as (1895 - 1983)

Creation date : 1936

Date shown:

Dimensions: Height 149.5 - Width 100

Technique and other indications: Color lithograph on paper Idea Créations, Saint-Ouen

Storage location: Website advertising museum

Contact copyright: © Les Arts décoratifs - Musée de la Publicité, Paris - Photo Laurent Sully Jaulmes - All rights reserved

Picture reference: inv. 13831

Weekend cigarettes with an English taste.

© Les Arts décoratifs - Musée de la Publicité, Paris - Photo Laurent Sully Jaulmes - All rights reserved

Publication date: January 2006

Historical context

From the origins of their promotion, around 1850, until the aftermath of the Great War, almost all the posters and advertising inserts in favor of aperitifs and cigarettes are similar to advertisements for medicines, for the former responsible for "invigorating »Those who are languid in constitution, for the latter to make asthma and cough disappear. These panaceas, sold exclusively in pharmacies, of course contain alcohol or tobacco, but only among other substances: cannabis and menthol, quinine and kola ...

These medicinal products were eclipsed in the mid-1920s, when brands of snacks and cigarettes multiplied, presumably to fight against foreign competition. In 1924, the Tobacco Industry Service (S.E.I.T.) created Week-end, cigarettes with "Virginia tobacco", in the hope of attracting a wealthy clientele and directly competing with American firms and oriental tobacco companies. The same year, the family of Lyon pharmacist Adhémar Juppet tried to promote Saint Raphaël to counter the Italian company Martini-Rossi.

Image Analysis

By name, but also by their slogan "Cigarettes tastes English", the Weekends evoke the weekend getaway after hard work, and abroad. The succession of packages that outline the road forms, because of the perspective, an immense triangle whose top merges with the horizon line. In this vertical frame, everything tends towards the sky: the trees, in massive borders, have abnormally thin and high stems; branding and text appear in the top quarter of the image. The shot is diurnal, and the blue of the package, which recalls the Gallic even though it is much darker, contrasts with the green of the trees and the orange of the countryside.

The technique used by Albert Solon to promote Saint Raphaël is quite different. Nothing in this nocturnal landscape evokes the South and escape. The two waiters who, since 1930, have symbolized the brand are converted into fishermen. They are seated with their legs in the water of a peaceful river which traces a bluish slant in the horizontal frame. The two cypress trees in the background are truncated and draw the viewer's gaze downwards and the two-way message "Always pleasant to take". The humor is further reinforced by the presence of this tandem made up of a tall lean, tintin tassel, body thrown back, and a small fat one guessing bald, who leans forward to grab his fresh fish bottle.

Interpretation

As soon as it is promoted, tobacco is associated with the car and its symbols of modernity and speed. From advertisement to advertisement, it expresses a futuristic and aerial world. From Alexis Kow in 1932 to Henri Morvan in 1954, including Sepo (1934) and René Maël (1940), most of the designers who will be employed by the S.E.I.T. then the S.E.I.T.A. (Company for the industrial exploitation of tobacco and matches) will then receive orders from major automobile brands.

Charles Loupot, on the contrary, like all the artists who will work for alcoholics, tries to express the calm, timelessness and antidote of civilization.

From the thirties, in numerous advertisements, alcohol and tobacco were associated with sport. But tennis is the only physical activity common to smoker and drinker. While the tobacco control company continually stages pilots at the wheel of racing cars, or even space shuttles, the alcoholics multiply the peaceful scenes of angling and bicycle rides to signify temporal stasis, land or sea anchorage. .

So, a priori, artists do not address the same recipient. The drinker cannot be the smoker. The first is traditional and earthy, the second is adventurous and airy. But isn't the art of advertisers to reconcile opposites, to emphasize the duality present in every human being? As proof, this alcohol-tobacco complementarity is reflected in the newspapers and magazines by countless links, the images of cigarettes and the advertisements for drinks spread out on the same pages.

  • alcoholism
  • Hobbies
  • publicity
  • tobacco

Bibliography

Éric GODEAU, “Tobacco advertising in France. From monopoly to competition (1925-2005)”, in Le Temps des medias, n ° 2 (“Publicité.Quelle histoire?”), Spring 2004, p.115- 126.Myriam TSIKOUNAS, “When alcohol makes its publicity. Advertisements in favor of alcohol in the French press”, in Le Temps des medias, n ° 2 (“Publicité.Quelle histoire?”), Spring 2004, p.99-114.

To cite this article

Myriam TSIKOUNAS, "The advertising codes of alcohol and tobacco in the 1930s"


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